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Adds new meaning to "master's voice".

Adds new meaning to “master’s voice”.


It’s read an RPG in Public Week! It’s time to let your gamer flag fly. Show the world that folks who play RPG’s aren’t neckbeards or cat piss men. We don’t live in our parents basements. We’re not creepy. Let’s also take this time to sit back and just enjoy gaming and not piss and moan about somebody “playing it wrong”.
Enjoy, game, read and be an example. It’s so simple even a puppy can do it.

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C&T-Remastered
Well. the Kickstarter for Crypts & Things remastered is live! I admit this one of my favorite retro-clones games. Here’s my rant on the first edition of the game.
First. it’s based around Swords & Wizardry and if you’ve hung around this blog long enough you that I’m a big fan. It also uses many of the Sword & Sorcery house rules from Akratic Wizardry. Also, it’s Swords & Sorcery. In formative years, I was much more into Fritz Leiber and Robert E. Howard than I was Tolkien. I just liked those stories better and the genre better. Heck, Sword & Sorcery deserves a lot more love than its gotten.
And lastly, in a fit of shameless self promotion, I continue working working on my first RPG product (The World of Skarynth) which just happens to be for Crypts & Things primarily. Heck, it was almost “done” then the Kickstarter came along. But no problems. It will just make things better.
So I’m behind this one 100%. It’s a rules system that is full of awesome sauce. It’s a genre that I’m much more passionate about than the usual elves, dwarves, and halflings. So I like it, I love it, I backed it. Just check it out and if you are so inclined back it too.

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A very old but popular post from the the other blog. Yep,this part of my migration with all the RPG stuff over here. But this post still gets hits and I think is relevant. Enjoy.

For those not up on the local gamer jargon, Whiff & Ping is easy to explain. Whiff: I swing, I “miss”. Ping: I swing, I hit, it bounces off my opponents thick scaly hide. Pretty much not matter what your system of choice is you’ve felt at least a little bit of this. In D&D, in it’s many forms, you’ve got high AC’s, Spell Resistance, Energy Resistance, Damage Resistance, Evasion, the lucky Saving Throw and the list goes on. In GURPS, you’ve got your Active Defense, Damage Reduction and a host of resistance rolls. In World of Darkness, you’ve got a one die pool mechanic, sometimes known as the “Roll a Pile of Dice and Nothing Happens” System. The danger of Whiff & Ping exist in pretty much every game.
At first glance, it might appear that Savage Worlds combat can suffer from Whiff & Ping Syndrome and in a way it does. In Savage Worlds, you have two defensive stats, Parry and Toughness. Parry is basically your target number to hit. Toughness is basically the target number to damage. Simple. Right? Anyway, some Big Bads can get some pretty high numbers. So it can be pretty hard for your buff fighter with a d8 in Fighting and shells out 2d8 in damage can hit the dragon but he’s going to have a hard time hurting it.
But here’s the deal. A lot of games out there basically use attrition damage systems (At least, that’s what I’m calling it here.) Let me explain. Most damage systems rely on a slow whittling away of Hit Points, Life Points, Wound Levels or whatever. Now, there’s nothing wrong with this. In a way, it’s kind of neat. It builds tension in the fight scene whether the players realize it or not. They slowly see their life getting chipped away bit by bit. When they hit an opponent, even it’s for the tiniest amount of damage it’s a reward. It builds the excitement and the players gain some sense of accomplishment. Our gaming brains have been wired to look at combat and damage in this light. Savage Worlds is more about the constant danger that the rug will be yanked out from underneath you at any moment. A couple of good hits and the right dice mojo will end a fight.
The act of hitting and not damaging an opponent equates to failure in most gamer’s minds. And nobody likes to fail. Even if you land that solid blow, you still might not hurt the guy. I’m going to use an extreme and overly simplified example here. Let’s say that we have an encounter with your standard D&D adventuring party of four versus a big nasty red dragon with 100 HP. On average due to various conditions each of our heroes does 5 HP a round to the dragon. It would take about five rounds with a total of 20 attacks to finally take down the dragon. In Savage Worlds, a similar encounter would run pretty much the same way. Twenty or so attacks until someone finally rams a sword through the beast’s eye. There will probably be a couple of Shaken results and maybe a Wound. Now, I know some of the math fetishists out there will want me to run some sort of simulation and work out all the probabilities. That ain’t happenin’.
Now it’s time to talk about the Whiff factor. This one is really simple. If you’re having problems hitting an opponent, read the Combat Survival Guide. If you are still having problems, you need to figure out if your GM is cranking up things too high. Finally, gauge your character to your oppoents. You might think your character is a bad ass but according the GM’s encounters, you’re a mook. Just talk things out, folk.
Just like any other game, it’s real easy to outclass the player characters if GM’s aren’t careful. The key here is just like every other game is to know the player characters and their capabilities and then design encounters that will challenge them. There’s no real magic bullet to balance an encounter and it doesn’t matter what game system you are using.

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A crazy and dangerous idea for the World of Yarc.
Imagine an area that is evil. It’s in a key location but nothing can be reallly done about it. It’s like an artifact that can’t be destroyed. A place where even the land itself is corrupted. It beckons to the weak willed and the power hungry. It draws them in and offers them great power.It can turn a peasant into mighty Lich. Corrupt a paladin into being a genocidal maniac.
Situated strategicaly between the Eastern and Mid Kingdoms, The Land of Primordial Evil is a power and dangerous place. Many fools have tried to harness its power with disasterous results.
Well meaning kings have attempted to build a wall around it but only to have some knight or even a lowly laborer fall under the spell of the land. If left alone or ignored. Someone will eventually be drawn in. The Valley of Primoridal Evil cannot be blocked off, guarded, blessed or dispelled.

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strangestars
Yes, this is a repost. But hey it’s a damned fine product.
Why the heck would I pay $10 for a system neutral setting that’s only 30 pages long? Because it’s freaking awesome.
If you’ve been following along with my blogging, I’ve been on a real space opera kick lately. When I heard about this, I thought cool. When I started hearing good things about it then I thought I just have to get this.
Now, I’ve seen plenty of system neutral settings or even settings with a system and so many of them sucked. They were clunky, over complicated or just down right silly. Strange Stars isn’t any of those things. The layout and the information is put forth in a clear, evocative and entertaining manner. While it’s system neutral, Game Masters have enough info to port it into whatever system they want. There’s plans for an official FATE version and an OSR style game. But heck you easily use Traveller, Hardnova 2, d6, Stars Without Number, Machinations of the Space Princess, Star Frontiers, X-Ploreres or Savage Worlds (There reliable rumors of a fan hack coming soon). Any way those would be my games of choice to run Strange Stars with.
The background is interesting. You can see the fingerprints of common settings and tropes without it seeming like somebody just filed off the serial numbers of Star Wars and Star Trek then tried to cram both of them into a crazy fanboy universe. And heck you could just tweak it and mix it with your own ideas.
All in all, Strange Stars has the goods. It’s got plenty of ideas for totally rad Space Opera from days gone by. Now if you more detail about what’s going on in the book, just head on over to Trey Causey’s (the author) blog.
You can get Strange Stars at Drivethrurpg. It’s worth every penny.

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